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Daiana Ruiz

Argentina

From illustrations for Rolling Stone magazine of rap artist Jay-Z, to drawing the contemporary trapping of being a mixed-race woman for Refinery 29, Daiana is very much in tune with the times.

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It’s no wonder that the work of Argentinian illustrator Daiana Ruiz radiates with warm colours, fruity hues and heaps of personality. The Buenos Aires-based graphic artist strongly identifies with her home country, and it shows. “I'm a Latin-American woman”, she begins. “I mostly like to represent earth tones, fruits, and I feel plants or animals usually complete my illustrations. Of course, I'm not surrounded by plants and fruits everyday. I live in the city and I love that environment too, the lights at night, the music. I think I like to mix all that up.”

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From illustrations for Rolling Stone magazine of rap artist Jay-Z, to drawing the contemporary trapping of being a mixed-race woman for Refinery 29, Daiana is very much in tune with the times. She recently made a pro-abortion illustration, too, and asserts: “A strong woman is a free woman.”

In the journey from little known artist to where she is now, she certainly seems to be a good example of a strong woman herself. “It took time and hard work for me to consolidate myself as a professional”, she says, “and now I can see the outcome of my efforts. That encourages me to keep learning and growing.”

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In her day-to-day, that hard work often means not keeping track of time too much. While drawing, she feels she “must be very organized so I don't skip lunch time.”

It’s interesting that Daiana works manually as well as digitally, as it is a reflection of how different mediums produce different experiences of time.

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Depending on the mood and on what the work needs, Daiana switches between both. When it comes to moving images, the illustrator avoids “figurative representations and focuses on shapes, colors and feelings.” As opposed to a still image that captures a moment in time – real or imagined –, with her loops, Daiana expresses something else, “something that will be moving forever.”

The freedom she has in her personal work, to go on creating as long and as unrestrained as she wants, is something she was happy to find while collaborating with Komono as well. During her mission to tell her story through the Signature Series, she “was free to represent things that I usually like to illustrate in my personal work.”

This time, the result was something close to her own way of being: “a confident Latin woman wearing a watch”, but still “connected with nature and surrounded by warm tones.”

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